Where Will Miggy End Up?

by JohnBowen

Today, Tigers third baseman Miguel Cabrera clubbed his 299th and 300th home runs of his career, which is surprisingly already in his tenth season. In doing so, Cabrera became one of just 13 players to hit his 300th home run before his 30th birthday, joining Alex Rodriguez, Ken Griffey Jr., Jimmie Foxx, Mickey Mantle, Eddie Matthews, Albert Pujols, Andruw Jones, Hank Aaron, Mel Ott, Juan Gonzalez, Frank Robinson, and Adam Dunn.

Of those gentlemen, only Pujols hit more than Cabrera’s 373 doubles.

This raises a question: where will Miguel Cabrera end up in his career? In what elite company will his numbers put him?

The company he’s in right now is pretty elite, no question about it – though it also includes a few gentlemen who went downhill fast after 30 (Jones, Dunn, to a lesser extent, Junior).

And boy, have people been clamoring that Cabrera will end up in that category. For years they’ve been doing that. In 2007, ESPN’s Jorge Arangure Jr. wrote an article about Cabrera’s apparently weight gain and how this could affect his future salary prospects. The Tigers were so concerned about his weight after trading for him that they only signed him to a  8-year, 152.3 million dollar deal – and Cabrera was so fat and out of shape that he has only hit .323/.401/.571 for a 157 OPS+ since signing the pact.

Of course, Cabrera isn’t 25 anymore. He’s 29; next April, he’ll hit the dreaded 3-0. Age carries with it changes in metabolism and an inherent downtrend in performance.

There’s also the fact that Cabrera has had his share of off-the-field incidents, almost all of which involve copious quantities of alcohol.

But through all that, he just keeps on hitting. DUI during spring training? No problem, he just wins a batting title and OBP title.

I’m going to put Miggy’s final career home run tally at 530, understanding that he’s unlikely to keep mashing exactly the same way through his 40’s unless he gives Jose Canseco a ring. That’ll put him in elite company as is, but once you factor in the fact that he’s well on his way to becoming just the fifth player to amass 700 doubles, after only Tris Speaker, Pete Rose, Stan Musial and Ty Cobb.

This would probably leave him safely among the top 20 pure hitters of all-time, with his defense bumping him down a notch or several.

Readers of Dugout Central, what do you think? Will Cabrera make it to that inner circle of Hall of Famers, or party his way into an early retirement?

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73 Responses to “Where Will Miggy End Up?”

  1. Cameron Says:

    I think Miggy’s career floor at this point will be Carlos Delgado’s sudden downturn in his late 30s that has him hover around 490. Though he’s not THAT big a guy yet.

  2. Raul Says:

    Readers of Dugout Central, what do you think? Will Cabrera make it to that inner circle of Hall of Famers, or party his way into an early retirement?

    I have no clue. I don’t think he’s the all-or-nothing type that will fall off like Adam Dunn.

    Cabrera has great plate discipline and doesn’t strike out excessively by today’s standards.

    700 doubles is a lot of doubles. I don’t think Cabrera gets there. A-Rod will be 37 in a week and he’s at 643…and apparently a little further passed the hill than people thought he would be. Cabrera not being the fittest player in the league, I’m not sure he exceeds that.

    I think Cabrera comes short of 500 HR (440-ish) and right around the 550 mark for doubles. Once he gets to age 33-34…the drop off will accelerate.

  3. Raul Says:

    The Oakland Athletics just swept the Yankees in a 4-game series.

  4. Chuck Says:

    I’m with Raul..

    I think Cabrera will have three or four typical Cabrera years then will hit the wall…hard.

  5. Patrick Says:

    I agree that his late 30’s won’t be kind to him unless he sheds some weight, which I doubt he has any plans to. He has one of the quickest bats I’ve ever seen but that doesn’t last forever.

    A’s are tied for a wildcard, I didn’t see that coming.

  6. Bob Says:

    Power is the last tool to develop, thus it is the last one to go. If the Tigers wise up and just use him as a DH ( my disdain for the position notwithstanding) Cabrera makes the HOF no problem.
    Thankfully the Tigers have Fielder at 1st and their bets positio prospect is a 3rd baseman, so Miguel will not stay in the field for much longer, outside of inter-league play.
    Hypothesis on July 23rd 2012 is that he makes the Hall.

  7. Chuck Says:

    Happy 39th birthday Nomar Garciaparra.

    The peaks and valleys in his career, going back to his college days clearly point to steriod use and despite a .313 career average and two batting titles he played just 1434 games in a 14 year career. He is HOF eligible on the 2015 ballot and I expect he’ll receive little or no support.

    Happy Birthday Don Drysdale.

    Rode the Dodger name and Sandy Koufax’ coattails all the way from Los Angeles to Cooperstown.

    IMO, easily one of the worst BBWAA selections ever and if given the power to remove ten guys he’d be gone.

    Happy Birthday Pee Wee Reese. Not a fan of him being in either, but he’s linked both as a player and broadcaster with Phil Rizzuto, so they’re either both in or both out…I don’t care either way.

    Happy Birthday Hank Allen…raise your hand if you knew Dick Allen had two brothers who played major league baseball? Hank is the senior of the three, and like the Cruz brothers, also had the shortest career.

  8. JohnBowen Says:

    “Rode the Dodger name and Sandy Koufax’ coattails all the way from Los Angeles to Cooperstown.”

    So…are you saying that Drysdale prevailed because he got to face other team’s number 2’s?

    He’s a borderline case for sure, but he pitched 3432 IP, and had a 1.148 WHIP, 2.95 ERA and won three strikeout crowns along with a Cy Young Award. His record of 209-166 might’ve been helped by facing other teams’ #2’s but it certainly was hurt by having such a putrid offense behind him.

    Also, it would seem that he would’ve garnered more attention if he had been The Man in LA, and not the #2. Wasn’t he more in Koufax’s shadow than riding coattails?

  9. Len Says:

    How is Drysdale easily the “worst” BBWAA selection ever? Based on what exactly?

    Herb Pennock and Rabbit Maranville are easily the two weakest BBWAA selections. Then you have Rice, Perez, Hunter, Apparicio, Lemon, Kiner, Trayner and Keeler. Then you can look at guys like Terry and Medwick.

    He was better than 3 of his HOF contemporaries like Bunning, Wynn and Ford. How is he even borderline? He’s a sold HOF pitcher if you understand the players/pitchers in the HOF.

    He was the best pitcher in baseball from 1957-1968.

    He finished in the top ten in K’s 11 times, top five 7 times, top three 6 times and led the league 3 times.

    He finished in the top ten in ERA 9 times, top five 4 times, top three 3 times.

    He finished in the top ten in K/bb 9 times, top five 5 times, top three twice.

    He finished in the top ten in Innings 11 times, top five 6 times, top three 4 times and led the league twice

    He finished in the top ten in Game Starts 9 times, top five 9 times, top three 8 times and led the league 4 times.

    He finished in the top ten in Shutouts 9 times, top five 7 times, top three 7 times and led the league once.

    He finished in the top ten in Whip 6 times, top five 5 times, top three 4 times and led the league once.

  10. Chuck Says:

    Len,

    “easily one of the worst BBWAA selections ever”

    thanks

  11. Raul Says:

    *facepalm*

    Len…if you’re going to use other bad HOF elections to justify Drysdale…eventually you end up letting everyone in.

    Although I have to give you credit. That “best pitcher in baseball from 1957-1968″ statement really made me laugh. I’ll put a quarter in your cup for that one.

  12. Raul Says:

    This is the world we live in…

    Apparently the praises of Mike Trout are reaching insane levels. So much so that Rangers manager Ron Washington was compelled to state flat-out that Mike Trout is not Willie Mays, and that people should relax with the comparisons.

    Mike Trout is having an awesome season. And he should be a great player for years to come. But anyone who compares him to Willie Mays after having played 114 career games should be taken to City Hall and publicly flogged for being a fucking dumb ass.

  13. Bob Says:

    Raul, gotta disagree with you. Although I am assume the latter half of your post was written in jest. Free speech allows people to fly banners that some people believe is offensive, while others can make claims about Trout being equal to or superior to Mays.
    As Steve Jobs told the 2005 Stanford grads, if you live everyday like it is your last day on Earth, one day your prediction will most surely be right.
    Although I know a left-winger like you does not believe in being publicly flogged. Right?
    And people make comparisons to players all the time.
    Rice to Dawson to Puckett.
    Morris to Lee Smith.
    And as I said over 2 years ago on this site, I consider Mays the best of all-time, as he played post 1947. I have yet to decide where I put guys like ARod and Pujols. Will wait until they retire.

  14. JohnBowen Says:

    I’m sorry, who compared Trout to Mays?

  15. JohnBowen Says:

    I will say, Trout’s having a better age-20 rookie season than Mays.

    We’ll see how the next 20 years shape up before we take the comparisons further.

    But as of now, he would get my MVP vote for this one year.

    And to think, the Angels wanted Vernon Wells to start over him.

  16. Bob Says:

    Actually Washington said there is currently no comparison. So blame/credit him.

  17. JohnBowen Says:

    Haha.

    Ron Washington: “Now, Kenny Rogers was pretty mean to shove that camera man, but these comparisons to Hitler need to stop!”

  18. JohnBowen Says:

    “Len…if you’re going to use other bad HOF elections to justify Drysdale…eventually you end up letting everyone in.”

    That might be the case if you let anyone who was better than Herb Pennock in the HOF (then you’d be looking at guys like David Cone, David Wells, Frank Viola, Dwight Gooden, Brad Radke, Mark Langston, etc).

    But Drysdale sits probably among with top-50 pitchers all-time. If that’s not good enough for a small-hall guy, fine…different strokes.

    His career doesn’t strike me as terribly different than Juan Marichal’s…slight nod to Marichal, but people regard him as an all-time great and their careers are pretty similar.

  19. Len Says:

    @11 Raul,

    What are you saying, Bunning, Wynn and Ford shouldn’t be in the HOF either?

    You don’t let everyone in if you let Drysdale in the HOF, Drysdale’s among the top 25-40 pitchers in BB history.

    There’s 63 pitchers in the HOF, Drysdale’s among the top 25-40 pitchers in BB history, what are you proposing, knocking out 30-40 pitchers and limiting the HOF to 20-25 pitchers?

    The HOF spent 70-80 years electing starting pitchers like Rube Marquard, Jesse Haines, Lefty Gomez, Jack Chesbro, Addie Joss, Herb Pennock, Burleigh Grimes, Chief Bender, Waite Hoyt, Catfish Hunter, Bob Lemon, and Eppa Rixey. You can’t just say, well those guys don’t count and that’s not what the HOF is about.

    As far as Drysdale being the best pitcher from 1957-1968:

    Wins-199, first
    Shutouts-48, first
    Innings Pitched-3270, first
    Game Starts-441, first
    K’s-2407, second
    Complete Games-164, second

    2.93 Era, 1.140 Whip, 2.97 k/bb ratio, 1962 Cy Young winner, 1962 TSN Pitcher of the year, 8 time All Star.

  20. Raul Says:

    @11 Raul,

    What are you saying, Bunning, Wynn and Ford shouldn’t be in the HOF either?

    I’m saying that your argument for Drysdale started by comparing him to shitty players in the Hall of Fame. And that’s a slippery slope.

    You don’t let everyone in if you let Drysdale in the HOF, Drysdale’s among the top 25-40 pitchers in BB history.

    There’s 63 pitchers in the HOF, Drysdale’s among the top 25-40 pitchers in BB history, what are you proposing, knocking out 30-40 pitchers and limiting the HOF to 20-25 pitchers?

    I do believe the Hall of Fame has a lot of players who probably don’t belong. I’d probably remove 30% of them.

    The HOF spent 70-80 years electing starting pitchers like Rube Marquard, Jesse Haines, Lefty Gomez, Jack Chesbro, Addie Joss, Herb Pennock, Burleigh Grimes, Chief Bender, Waite Hoyt, Catfish Hunter, Bob Lemon, and Eppa Rixey. You can’t just say, well those guys don’t count and that’s not what the HOF is about.

    They count. And I can say that’s not what the HOF is about.

    As far as Drysdale being the best pitcher from 1957-1968:

    Wins-199, first
    Shutouts-48, first
    Innings Pitched-3270, first
    Game Starts-441, first
    K’s-2407, second
    Complete Games-164, second

    2.93 Era, 1.140 Whip, 2.97 k/bb ratio, 1962 Cy Young winner, 1962 TSN Pitcher of the year, 8 time All Star.

    That’s fantastic.

  21. Len Says:

    @18 John B.

    The Herb Pennock line is lower than that. You’re talking about Fernando Valenzuela, Mel Stottlyemyre, Steve Rogers, Mickey Lolich, Frank Viola, Dennis Martinez.

    Yeah I think Marichal benefitted greatly in run support because he had guys like Mays, McCovey and Cepeda batting behind him. As a result his W-L records are more gaudy than Drysdale. Drysdale had fairly mediocre run support most of his Dodger tenure and pretty terrible run support in ‘59-60 when he was at his best. Pretty bad run support in ‘67-68 as well.

    Marichal’s peak was a lot better than Drysdale’s peak heck he was probably better than Koufax in ‘65 but Marichal’s overall prime was shorter, 8 years as opposed to 12 for Drysdale. The last 5 years of Marichal’s career was pretty lousy.

    I think it also hurt as far as perception goes that Drysdale spent a lot of his career as the #2 pitcher for the Dodgers.

  22. Len Says:

    @Raul,

    I wasn’t making a HOF argument for Drysdale by comparing him to “shitty” players. I was refuted the claim that he was the “worst” BBWAA selection.

    My point is that the Baseball HOF is not the way it’s perceived by many people. There’s 237 players in HOF yet people act as if there are 50 players in the HOF.

    You can’t elect guys like Jesse Haines and Rube Marquard for 70-80 years and act like it’s an “elite” institution.

  23. JohnBowen Says:

    But, to Raul’s point, you can change the standards of what you call greatness.

    It’s not like you can kick out the outer rung of players, but maybe you say, okay Curt Schilling/Mike Mussina/John Smoltz – you guys were good, and you were better than Herb Pennock and Catfish Hunter and Jesse Haines and many others. But from now on, the HOF is for Pedro/Maddux/R. Johnson and folks on their level. And no, we’re not going to kick Pennock and Hunter and Haines out. But we’re also not going to let you in either. Tough shit.

    Not necessarily my stance, but nothing wrong with that either.

  24. Chuck Says:

    There should be a moratorium on any HOF discussion until December.

  25. Len Says:

    @23, John

    Well I can’t see how you can just radically change the standards of an institution 80 years after it’s been in existence. The HOF has never had a Pedro/Maddux/Johnson standard so I don’t know how you can institute one now. If the HOF had that type of standard then you would have about 15 pitchers in the HOF. Basically Robin Roberts/Steve Carlton would be considered borderline selections under that scenario. Sandy Koufax, Jim Palmer, Bob Feller, Nolan Ryan and Fergie Jenkins etc. wouldn’t be good enough.

    Mussina/Schilling/Glavine/Smoltz were better than 60% of the pitchers in the HOF, so your Pennock/Haines comparison doesn’t really apply.

    I’m not advocating a lowest common denominator level like Jesse Haines or Herb Pennock. If that were the case you would have to elect 150 pitchers into the HOF. What I’m saying is pitchers/players should meet a standard of an average or median HOF player at each particular position. In the case of starting pitchers you’re talking about the Vic Willis, Hal Newhouser, Red Faber, Early Winn, Jim Bunning territory. So you’re talking about Mussina/Schilling/Glavine/Smoltz/Halladay among Non eligible pitchers.

  26. Brautigan Says:

    Easily the worst hall of famer has to be Rick Ferrell. Which sucks, because I have 5 Rick Ferrell autographs.

    I think it is a greater shame that his brother Wes is not in the hall of fame.

  27. Bob Says:

    The bare essentials. 1692 hits, of which 28 were dingers. Yeah, he might be the infamous one.

  28. Raul Says:

    Well I can’t see how you can just radically change the standards of an institution 80 years after it’s been in existence.

    Sure you can. You change it. Because it’s not functioning as it should. Or are you one of these “tradition is tradition and we won’t change it because tradition” guys? Sounds like you are. And that’s pretty stupid.

    The HOF has never had a Pedro/Maddux/Johnson standard so I don’t know how you can institute one now.

    The 1st HOF ballot elected 5 guys that to this day are still among the greatest 15-20 players ever. So yeah, that’s pretty fucking high. And even if it wasn’t…you can still change the standards. What logical reason would you come up with that you couldn’t?

    Mussina/Schilling/Glavine/Smoltz were better than 60% of the pitchers in the HOF, so your Pennock/Haines comparison doesn’t really apply.

    Actually it applies perfectly. You just don’t understand how.

    I’m not advocating a lowest common denominator level like Jesse Haines or Herb Pennock. If that were the case you would have to elect 150 pitchers into the HOF. What I’m saying is pitchers/players should meet a standard of an average or median HOF player at each particular position.

    You realize this de-values the HOF over time, right?

  29. Patrick Says:

    @23 see John, we can agree on some things. The problem is, they have to elect someone every year, so once in awhile there will be down years and Barry Larkin and Ron Santo skate right in.

    I think Larkin and Drysdale are similar. Great players but I would like to see more counting stats to be enshrined. I guess Omar Vizquel will have to get in too.

    About Santo, how cruel is that to wait for him to die and then put him in?

  30. JohnBowen Says:

    “Great players but I would like to see more counting stats to be enshrined. I guess Omar Vizquel will have to get in too.”

    Larkin ranks easily in the top-10 in hits, doubles, triples, home runs, RBI’s, runs scored etc among SS’s.

  31. Chuck Says:

    “Larkin ranks easily in the top-10 in hits, doubles, triples, home runs, RBI’s, runs scored etc among SS’s”

    Big effin’ whoop.

    You elect the player, not the position.

    Can’t wait for all the bullshit to start about Jeff Kent being a HOFer because he has more homers than any other second baseman.

  32. JohnBowen Says:

    Jeff Kent was painfully bad with the glove.

    Larkin was not.

  33. Chuck Says:

    “Jeff Kent was painfully bad with the glove.”

    So was Tim Raines.

    Getting smarter in your old age..good to see.

  34. JohnBowen Says:

    “So was Tim Raines.”

    Ok buddy. Find one other person who feels that way.

  35. Patrick Says:

    Raines did one good thing with the glove, he used to snort coke off of it in LF.

  36. Chuck Says:

    “Ok buddy. Find one other person who feels that way.”

    Your precious dWAR says so.

    Don’t start your shit on another thread, John.

    You can’t pick and choose whether WAR is good or bad based on whether or not it suits your argument.

  37. Chuck Says:

    Dbacks DFA’d Ryan Roberts.

  38. JohnBowen Says:

    “Your precious dWAR says so.”

    Not really…considering that most of that negative value is just from being a leftfielder, that comes out to about -0.5…so, if you replaced Tim Raines with a league average player in leftfield for 23 seasons, his teams would’ve given up 5 fewer runs or so.

    Does anyone else have subjective opinion on Raines’s supposed inability with the glove?

  39. JohnBowen Says:

    So, I’m watching what I imagine will be Greinke’s last start with the Brewers.

    Hopefully he jack up his trade value tonight.

  40. Chuck Says:

    Raines’ career dWAR is -9.5.

    He was below league average in RF and RF/game.

    He sucked.

    Your subjective opinion is irrelevant.

  41. JohnBowen Says:

    “Not really…considering that most of that negative value is just from being a leftfielder”

    Read English.

  42. Chuck Says:

    Good comeback.

  43. JohnBowen Says:

    “He was below league average in RF and RF/game.”

    Tim Raines, RF/9: 2.09
    League Average : 2.11

    Technically, you’re correct. That comes out to 3 plays a season.

  44. Chuck Says:

    I can’t imagine the insecurity you must feel in yourself to get a tattoo on your neck.

    Yadier Molina comes from a prominent baseball family and is a ML All-Star and a WS champion, and yet he feels he needs body art to be relevant.

    Can’t comprehend that.

  45. JohnBowen Says:

    I – words cannot express…how frustrating the Brewers are to follow.

    Martin Maldonado just got picked off third. With the bases loaded.

    Cliff Lee’s just chilling out off the rubber. The 3B (I wanna say Wiggington?) is about 8-10 feet off third base. Lee tosses a lazy ball over to the bag.

    Instead of retreating literally one foot back to third base, Martin Maldonado breaks for home.

    Zack’s gonna miss all this, that’s for sure.

  46. Chuck Says:

    How was the play scored?

  47. JohnBowen Says:

    Should just be CS 1-5, no?

  48. JohnBowen Says:

    Greinke has set down 10 in a row and just hit a solo home run.

    Paying attention, Atlanta?

  49. Chuck Says:

    So Lee gets an assist and Wigginton a put-out?

    Range factor goes up.

    For standing still.

  50. Chuck Says:

    Greinke’s not going to Atlanta.

    Especially if they pull off the Dempster deal.

    Wandy Rodriguez to Pittsburgh.

  51. JohnBowen Says:

    Negligible, Chuck, at least for a full season.

    And no one’s gonna look at 18 games of work to make a judgement…assuming they understand small sample size.

    The Brewers are probably asking for too much from Atlanta; LA is back in the sweepstakes for Dempster though. We’ll see what happens.

  52. Brautigan Says:

    Justin Smoak, a “can’t miss” prospect, just missed.

  53. JohnBowen Says:

    Incredible.

    The Brewers bullpen blew a 6-3 ninth inning lead last night and blew a 6-1 lead tonight.

    These chances get converted 99% of the time by normal bullpens.

  54. Chuck Says:

    “These chances get converted 99% of the time by normal bullpens.”

    Two words for you.

    Complete game.

  55. JohnBowen Says:

    In this case, yeah.

    Greinke had 86 pitches.

    He had retired 14 in a row.

    What are you saving him for?

    And our bullpen is historically bad. This might go down as the worst bullpen of all-time.

  56. Lefty33 Says:

    “And our bullpen is historically bad. This might go down as the worst bullpen of all-time.”

    Based on the Phillies dumpster fire of a bullpen this year it’ll be a fight to the finish.

  57. JohnBowen Says:

    The Brewers bullpen has blown 18 leads in the 8th inning or later.

    Last year, we had like, 5.

  58. Lefty33 Says:

    Also add in the Mets for the worst bullpen race as well.

    They’ve got 16 BS and an ERA of 5.16.

  59. Chuck Says:

    Dempster officially says no to Braves and will start tomorrow for Cubs.

  60. Raul Says:

    Milwaukee isn’t keeping Greinke. They should be riding him like they did Sabathia.

  61. Mike Felber Says:

    Drysdale seems at least a borderline selection. His peak & longevity, ERA +, being relatively good with the bat added value. I would take him. Though the case made for him for best for ALL of his good years is based mostly on workload. Wins are irrelevant Ks great, but only a single way to add value. His peak was no where near the greats of that era, but cherry pick those years & value consistency, then you can make a case for him.

    I agree with you Len on the preferred standards of HOF guys. No, taking AT LEAST an HOF average guy will not erode the standards of the Hall over time, the opposite. Those modern pitchers you cited to get in-yeah, I would take them all. The Smoltz-level guys should be about the lowest that go in, which would be an improvement.

    They elected amongst the best ever at 1st due to having a limited # they could or would induct at once with a massive backlog of players. Then they busily elected substandard guys often.

  62. Mike Felber Says:

    Smoltz given peak & career value may be borderline with what he did with just regular season pitching. His excellent 125 ERA + was a bit exaggerated by team defense, Drysdale’s greater IP also per year meant better peak. Small factor is decent bat for a pitcher, but you need to add in the equivalent of one excellent year for 209 IP with 2.67 ERA +in the post season.

  63. Chuck Says:

    Hamels, 6 years, 140 million, second highest paid pitcher ever. Bye, bye Cliff Lee.

    Hanley Ramirez to the Dodgers.

    ARod HBP, broken hand, out six to eight weeks.

  64. Patrick Says:

    Wow, Hamels is good but this reminds me of when the Dodgers(?) made Andy Messersmith the first million dollar pitcher.

    At first I had a brain fart when I read that and thought it was Jason Hammel, the Orioles best pitcher and the guy Tampa genius Friedman gave away to Colorado for ARod (Aneury Rodriquez), a life-long minor leaguer.

    Now Friedman gets to face him every year as the Orioles’#1. Aneury is in the Astos system, but not good enough to crack the roster.

    Hamels and Hammel are having similar years. I guess Aneury is short for aneurism.

  65. Chuck Says:

    RIP George Jefferson

  66. Patrick Says:

    I just checked in on Aneury. He pitched last night for OK City, 1 ip, 7 base runners, 6 runs. His ERA is 6.82 and he’s given up 117 hits in 82 innings.

    The Astros got him via Rule 5 from Tampa the following spring of the Hammel trade so Friedman got nothing for Hammel.

  67. Chuck Says:

    Interesting to note the top five contracts ever given to a pitcher were all to left-handers…Lee, Hamels, Sabathia, Santana and Mike Hampton.

  68. Chuck Says:

    Actually, six..forgot Barry Zito

  69. Patrick Says:

    I’d say just one guy might be earning it, with the jury still out on Hamels.

  70. Chuck Says:

    Breaking his hand wasn’t the only negative to ARod’s game last night..he also became the fifth player in ML history to strike out 2000 times.

  71. Bob Says:

    The Dodgers acguired Hanley. Magic and his team are spending.

  72. JohnBowen Says:

    More a longevity thing than anything else; he’s never had more than 140 in a year. He’s been top-10 in the league 4 times, only once higher than 7th.

  73. JohnBowen Says:

    I give Chuck a fair amount of shit, but he nailed this one. With new ownership, the Dodgers are able to take on some major salary and are doing so.

    “Ramirez not only bolsters the Dodgers offense, he can immediately take over shortstop until Dee Gordon returns from the disabled list in a month. Then Ramirez can move over to third base, a problem area that was dealt an additional blow Tuesday night when Adam Kennedy aggravated a groin strain.”

    First off, mlb.com, Adam Kennedy being hurt is not a problem.

    But ok, where do the Dodgers ideally place Hanley? SS or 3B? He has had his struggles at both and the Dodgers kinda suck at both.

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